NURS 6052, Section 7, Essentials of Evidence-Based Practice – Week 5 Project: Literature Review

NURS 6052, Section 7, Essentials of Evidence-Based Practice – Week 5 Project: Literature Review

NURS 6052, Section 7, Essentials of Evidence-Based Practice – Week 5 Project: Literature Review
Week 5 Project: Literature Review
There are numerous reasons that literature reviews are conducted. Many research problems are because of personal interest and is significant or beneficial in daily life (Polit & Beck, 2012, p. 84). This paper will provide a probable explanation of inconsistencies and contradictions of the literature. The question is, does limited separation between mother and newborn have a positive effect on their attachment, compared to newborns staying in the nursery, as evidence by staff and patient perception and the decreased number of babies in the nursery with the implementation of the Baby-Friendly Hospital Initiative (BFHI). The initiative enables and encourages breastfeeding and bonding of mothers with their infants while recognizing hospitals and birthing centers for offering the best care and improving exclusive breastfeeding rates (Baby-Friendly USA, n.d.). NURS 6052, Section 7, Essentials of Evidence-Based Practice – Week 5 Project: Literature Review.
ORDER A CUSTOM-WRITTEN PAPER NOW
Literature Review
The first article evaluated: Breastfeeding promotion for infants in neonatal units: a systematic review(Renfrew et al., 2010).  The instances of breastfeeding are low internationally in neonatal units. “The study evaluated the effectiveness of clinical, public health and health promotion interventions that may promote or inhibit breastfeeding feeding for infants admitted to neonatal units” (Renfrew et al., 2010, para. 1). The study was a systemic review that had a narrative synthesis. The intention was to use controlled studies to intervene causing infants admitted to neonatal units to be fed breast milk. NURS 6052, Section 7, Essentials of Evidence-Based Practice – Week 5 Project: Literature Review. In short-term outcomes only forty-eight studies were identified for single interventions in stable infants (Renfrew et al., para 3). Several interventions were identified in conclusion to the study including kangarooing using skin-to-skin, milk expression, support, training of the staff, and the UNICEF Baby-Friendly accreditation (Renfrew et al., 2010). In the study, there were certain gaps in evidence for outcomes, cost, and maternal health. More policy should be in place for infant feedings in neonatal units so many people are still unclear on how it effects them. The second article: Barriers, Facilitators, and Recommendations Related to Implementing the Baby-Friendly Initiative (BFI): An Integrative Review (Semenic & Childerhose, 2012). In the study, the goal was to research the international and peer-reviewed literature on the design and barriers related to the Baby-Friendly Initiative. The researchers used thirteen databases search the topic (Semenic & Childerhose, 2012). For the results of the search, there were forty-five articles from sixteen countries that met the criteria to be in the review. They used Cooper’s five stages of integrative research review for the analysis of the data (Semenic & Childerhose, 2012). In conclusion to the study, there were many obstacles identified along with solutions for the implementation of the Baby-Friendly Initiative. NURS 6052, Section 7, Essentials of Evidence-Based Practice – Week 5 Project: Literature Review. The priority issues identified were endorsements of policy makers for administration and government, hospital staff training, the influence of formula marketing, and union of community and hospital health services. To help promote the implementation of BFI in hospitals, strategies such as context-focused research and framing BFI as a multilevel, and sophisticated evidence-based change process should be used as a guide (Semenic & Childerhose, 2012). There were limitations to the study due to limited articles that are published in English so findings may not be interchangeable with other populations and health systems. There were also few studies on BFI in the community and specialty settings. NURS 6052, Section 7, Essentials of Evidence-Based Practice – Week 5 Project: Literature Review.
The third article: Compliance with the Baby-Friendly Hospital Initiative and impact on breastfeeding rates (Hawkins, Stern, Baum, & Gillman, 2014).  The objective of the study was to research how compliant hospitals are with the Baby-Friendly Hospital Initiative and to evaluate maternal education level with the initiation and duration of breastfeeding. In the study was 915 moms were from BFHI accredited, and 1099 moms were from non-accredited facilities in Maine (Hawkins, Stern, Baum, & Gillman, 2014).  NURS 6052, Section 7, Essentials of Evidence-Based Practice – Week 5 Project: Literature Review. The questionnaire reported that mothers stated seven of the ten essential practices for BFHI were done. A self-report for breastfeeding initiation carried out by all participants for exclusive breastfeeding or any breastfeeding of four weeks or more. Mothers that reported experiencing practicing breastfeeding. Mothers’ reported getting formula gift packs. BFHI increase instances of mothers’ with lower education initiating breastfeeding. Mothers’ with higher education did not have increased breastfeeding rates (Hawkins et al., 2014). There is not optimal compliance in the BFHI accredited facilities. More compliance would result in reduced socio-economic disparities and higher rates of breastfeeding. I believe for this study to be beneficial to change practice there needs to be a bigger group of those surveyed NURS 6052, Section 7, Essentials of Evidence-Based Practice – Week 5 Project: Literature Review.
The fourth article: Early contact and breastfeeding in a baby friendly hospital (D’Artibale & Bercini, 2013). The study was conducted to analyze factors that involved Baby-Friendly Hospitals and the experience of breastfeeding women and early contact with their baby. The University Hospital of Maringa is where the research was conducted with there being 16 participants who shortly after birth were able to establish contact and breastfeed with their baby(D’Artibale & Bercini, 2013). Data collect from November 2011- January 2012 through interviews, notes, and nonparticipating systematic observation (D’Artibale & Bercini, 2013). The initiation of breastfeeding shortly after birth feelings were favorable in the promotion of mother and baby bonding. Caesarean delivery and routine care were priorities, which was the obstacle of the study. It will be necessary to go beyond the technical approach for the initiative to move forward.
The fifth article: Staff Perceptions and Experiences of Implementing the Baby Friendly Initiative in Neonatal Intensive Care Units in Australia(Taylor, Sheehan, Gribble, & Dykes, 2011). “This study examined the implementation of the Baby-Friendly Hospital Initiative (BFHI) in the neonatal intensive care unit (NICU) and to understand perceptions and experiences of the staff”(Taylor, Sheehan, Gribble, & Dykes, 2011). Participants were from the Australian metropolitan area. There were 20 neonatal nurses, 18 midwives and a focus group of 8 BFHI hospital coordinators that were interviewed from four maternity hospitals, two were NICU (Taylor, Sheehan, Gribble, & Dykes, 2011). The study resulted in participants that had mistaken beliefs of how BFHI is applied in the NICU. Many of the concerns for BFHI were because of additional work, differences of NICUs and maternity units. Clearer guidelines are crucial for the achievement of the BFHI program NURS 6052, Section 7, Essentials of Evidence-Based Practice – Week 5 Project: Literature Review.
Summary
There were no significant inconsistencies and contradictions in the literature that I found. There were many articles found in aid of my preliminary conclusion of answering the PICO(T) question; does limited separation between mother and newborn have a positive effect on their attachment, compared to infants staying in the nursery, as evidence by staff and patient perception and the decreased number of babies in the nursery with the implementation of the Baby-Friendly Hospital Initiative (BFHI).  In the studies found there were definite conclusions for the implementation of the Baby-Friendly Hospital Initiative and, there were also studies that needed further research. NURS 6052, Section 7, Essentials of Evidence-Based Practice – Week 5 Project: Literature Review.
References
Baby-Friendly USA. (n.d.). Baby-Friendly Hospital Initiative. Retrieved October 1, 2016, from http://www.babyfriendlyusa.org/about-us/baby-friendly-hospital-initiative
D’Artibale, E. F., & Bercini, L. O. (2013). Early contact and breastfeeding in a baby friendly hospital. Online Brazilian Journal of Nursing, 12, 587-589. Retrieved from http://web.b.ebscohost.com.ezp.waldenulibrary.org/ehost/detail/detail?vid=11&sid=1a8d728b-418d-4401-b0b8-16ab8231a79c%40sessionmgr106&hid=123&bdata=JnNpdGU9ZWhvc3QtbGl2ZSZzY29wZT1zaXRl#AN=104112269&db=rzh
Hawkins, S. S., Stern, A. D., Baum, C. F., & Gillman, M. W. (2014). Compliance with the Baby-Friendly Hospital Initiative and impact on breastfeeding rates. Archives Of Disease In Childhood — Fetal & Neonatal Edition, 99(2), F138-43. http://dx.doi.org/10.1136/archdischild-2013-304842
Polit, D. F., & Beck, C. T. (2012). Nursing research: generating and assessing evidence for nursing (9th ed.). Philadelphia, PA: Lippincott Williams & Wilkins.
Renfrew, M. J., Dyson, L., McCormick, F., Misso, K., Stenhouse, E., King, S. E., & Williams, A. F. (2010). Breastfeeding promotion for infants in neonatal units: a systematic review. Child: care, health and development, 36(2), 165-178. http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/j.1365-2214.2009.01018.x
Semenic, S., & Childerhose, J. E. (2012, March 21). Barriers, facilitators, and recommendations related to implementing the Baby-Friendly Initiative (BFI): an integrative review. Journal of Human Lactation, 20(10), 1-18. http://dx.doi.org/10.1177/0890334412445195
Taylor, C., Sheehan, A., Gribble, K. D., & Dykes, F. (2011, January). Staff perceptions and experiences of implementing the Baby Friendly Initiative in neonatal intensive care units in Australia. Journal of Obstetric Gynecologic & Neonatal Nursing, 40(1), 25-34. http://dx.doi.org/0.1111/j.1552-6909.2010.01204.x NURS 6052, Section 7, Essentials of Evidence-Based Practice – Week 5 Project: Literature Review

Is this the question you were looking for? If so, place your order here to get started!

Related posts