Peacekeeping Annotated Bibliography

ANNOTATED BIBLIOGRAPHY: PEACEKEEPING

Bellamy, Alex, and Paul Williams. 2010. Understanding Peacekeeping. Cambridge: Polity.

This secondary source is written by Bellamy and Williams highlights the history and nature of peacekeeping operations since the establishment of the United Nations in 1945 up to the 21st century. The book is well-documented in the extent that it also includes the types of peace operations and the challenges peacekeepers today face regarding its operations.

Christoff, Joseph. 2007. Peacekeeping: Observations on Costs, Strengths, and Limitations of U.S. and UN Operations. Washington, D.C.: United States Government Accountability Office.

This report or testimony of the US Director of International Affairs and Trade outlines that peacekeeping missions conducted by the United Nations are very costly for the United States or overall due to the services and operations it has in 15 locations around the globe. This secondary source also outlines the strengths of UN peacekeeping in organizing its missions, but also shows that the US can impose peacekeeping operations on its own as compared to the UN. With the United States as one of the important members of the UN, their input and influence in peacekeeping operations is crucial because of the US acts on its own, the power of the UN operations would be halved.

Fortna, Virginia Page. 2004. “Does Peacekeeping Keep Peace? International Intervention and the Duration of Peace after Civil War.” International Studies Quarterly 48 (2): 269-292.

This scholarly article for the International Studies Quarterly presents one of the most crucial arguments regarding UN peacekeeping is its capacity to keep the peace. The article showcases that most peacekeeping operations do not have the capacity to influence civil wars as there is another round of war ever so often between these conflicting parties. Operations are even recorded to fail when the peacekeepers are in the vicinity; however, these failures have improved throughout the years. In support to this argument, the author had cited examples of peacekeeping operations since its inception. This article is crucial as it showcases whether or not there is a need to improve UN action to protect peace or if UN peacekeeping is effective.

Grieg, J. Michael, and Paul Diehl. 2005. “The Peacekeeping-Peacemaking Dilemma.” International Studies Quarterly 49 (4): 621-645.

This scholarly article stresses the importance of peacekeeping as an essential tool for conflict management and through the years, have enticed various scholars to point out the impacts of these operations to both interstate and civil conflicts. Through the use of civil war rivalries and conflicts from 1946 to 1999, the authors explore the success rate of peacekeeping/peacemaking and identify the stages of conflict management to determine the possible means to improve peacekeeping. If the peacekeeping is unable to improve on both interstate and civil conflicts, there is a necessity to revise its procedures.

O’Neill, John Terence, and Nicholas Rees. 2005. United Nations Peacekeeping in the Post-Cold War Era. Oxon: Taylor & Francis.

This book provides a condensed study as to how peacekeeping missions for the United Nations have changed since the time of the Cold War and in Post-Cold War. The authors first provided a brief introduction on peacekeeping operations as far as its characteristics in the Cold War period and cited four notable peacekeeping missions after the Cold War. It was argued in the book that UN peacekeeping remains flawed despite attempts to improve peacekeeping operations due to the arguments between UN member states in achieving their goals in these operations.

Sheehan, Nadege. 2008. “Economics of UN Peacekeeping Operations.” In War, Peace and Security, by Jacques Fontanel and Manas Chatterji, 173-188. Bingley: Emerald Group Publishing.

This secondary source provides an overview as to how UN members divide the responsibilities and expenses for UN peacekeeping operations. For 1996 to 2006, the UN operations have amounted to $44.81 billion because of the growing threats to international security within nations and the calls for the UN to act on these issues because of the UN Charter in advocating the prevention of use of force. The chapter first outlines the characteristics of UN peacekeeping operations before explaining as to why the expenditure of these operations have increased from 1988 to the present. Examples are provided in the chapter to expound on these expenditures and

Shimizu, Hirofumi, and Todd Sandler. 2002. “Peacekeeping and Burden-Sharing, 1994-2000.” Journal of Peace Research 39 (6): 651-668.

In support to the chapter written by Sheehan, this scholarly article provides a study as to how peacekeeping missions affect both large countries and smaller countries, with the larger countries carrying the brunt of expenses. The authors provide a case study analysis with the use of UN-led peacekeeping missions and non-UN led missions to implicate that the UN mostly spends its budget on troop expense rather than understanding the situation prior to the operation. Regardless of these sentiments on expenditure and effectiveness, the article offers other insights as to why peacekeeping should be respected as a means to improve societies in conflict.

Bibliography

Bellamy, Alex, and Paul Williams. 2010. Understanding Peacekeeping. Cambridge: Polity.
Christoff, Joseph. 2007. Peacekeeping: Observations on Costs, Strengths, and Limitations of U.S. and UN Operations. Washington, D.C.: United States Government Accountability Office.
Fortna, Virginia Page. 2004. “Does Peacekeeping Keep Peace? International Intervention and the Duration of Peace after Civil War.” International Studies Quarterly 48 (2): 269-292.
Grieg, J. Michael, and Paul Diehl. 2005. “The Peacekeeping-Peacemaking Dilemma.” International Studies Quarterly 49 (4): 621-645.
O’Neill, John Terence, and Nicholas Rees. 2005. United Nations Peacekeeping in the Post-Cold War Era. Oxon: Taylor & Francis.
Sheehan, Nadege. 2008. “Economics of UN Peacekeeping Operations.” In War, Peace and Security, by Jacques Fontanel and Manas Chatterji, 173-188. Bingley: Emerald Group Publishing.
Shimizu, Hirofumi, and Todd Sandler. 2002. “Peacekeeping and Burden-Sharing, 1994-2000.” Journal of Peace Research 39 (6): 651-668.

Is this the question you were looking for? If so, place your order here to get started!

Related posts