Good Annotated Bibliography On Euthanasia

Annotated Bibliography

Chao, D. V. K., N. Y. Chan and W. Y. Chan. “Euthanasia Revisited.” Family Practice, 19 (2002): 128-134. Print.

In this journal article, Euthanasia Revisited, Chao, Chan and Chan offers an insightful overview about euthanasia in their report. The journal article gives a lot of insights on the definition of euthanasia to include an elaborate classification of euthanasia. Their recognition of euthanasia as a debatable issue prompted them to make an extensive research on the history of euthanasia in humans in developed countries such as The Netherlands, Australia, United Kingdom and the United States of America.

Chao, Chan, and Chan also attempt to illustrate how debates (i.e. court cases and court decisions) among the four countries help shape the development of euthanasia. This journal article gives a condensed but not overly simplistic view of the pros and cons of euthanasia. The role of physicians on the family of terminally-ill patients was also discussed briefly. This report is very easy to read and the information that was presented may be very useful when opening a discussion about euthanasia.

Clevenger, J. and P. H. Kass. “Determinants of Adoption and Euthanasia of Shelter Dogs Spayed or Neutered in the University of California Veterinary Student Surgery Program Compared to Other Shelter Dogs.” Journal of Veterinary Medicine Education, 30.4 (2003): 372-378. Print.
This journal article published by reputable veterinarians Jaime Clevenger and Philip H. Kass offers insights on how to combat the overpopulation of pets by way of adoption rather than considering euthanasia. Their report emphasized the importance of veterinary medical schools in providing free shelter for animals. The goal of their research is to illustrate how the rate of euthanasia can be decreased through collaborative efforts of local animal shelters and veterinary schools. It is also the aim of their study to determine the effect of pre-adoption neutering in the rates of adoption versus euthanasia in veterinary schools and local animal shelter.

Their findings suggested that neutered dogs had a lower rate of euthanasia and that the sex of the animal do not play a central role in decreasing the rate of euthanasia. Higher rates of dog euthanasia were found among the following breeds: pit bull, rottweiler, and chow chow. Age was also a factor in euthanasia. Juvenile dogs had lower rates of euthanasia than adults. Further, the probabilities of euthanasia because of behavioral or medical reasons were found to be lower in veterinary schools than in local animal shelter. However, the limited space increases the factor of euthanasia in animals.

The study reports the importance of veterinary surgical team in schools to teach those in the animal local centers surgical methods that would help lower the population of animal breeding thereby decreasing animal surplus and avoiding euthanasia by medical and behavioral reasons. This report can be used to support claims that there are alternative methods in controlling animal population rather than employing euthanasia.
Kure, J. Euthanasia–“The Good Death” Controversy in Humans and Animals. Rijeka, Croatia: InTech, 2011. Print.

This book is written by a distinguished philosopher and bioethicist Dr. Josef Kure. What separates Dr. Kure’s book from the others is its holistic approach in discussing euthanasia. Unlike other books, Dr. Kure not only covers euthanasia in humans but also include a very elaborate discussion about euthanasia in animals as well.

In this book, Dr. Kure tackles euthanasia using various lenses (i.e. history, medicine, philosophy, and the society). He even further extended his discussion up to the aspect of existence. The book presents the ideas, issues and debates in a well-balanced and insightful manner such that it engages the readers to dig deep and be more critical about the subject.

The chapters in this text are easy to use not only in writing overview about the history and definition of euthanasia but it can also be cited in the main parts of the discussion. Aside from the historical overview and definitions the chapters also include: (1) the intricacies of euthanasia, (2) different arguments and debates with focus on voluntary euthanasia practice in Belgium and The Netherlands, (3) public policy and perceptions of medical professionals, and (4) euthanasia of animals particularly its use in population control.

Rollin, B. E. “Ethics and Euthanasia.” Commentary. The Canadian Veterinary Journal, 50.10 (2009):1081-1086. Print.
Rollin’s commentary on Ethics and Euthanasia demonstrates a very straightforward and positive view about euthanizing animals. Rollin’s opinion in this article is founded on various citations that he used to establish his argument. Thus, this makes his commentary useful when taking the affirmative side of the debate in euthanasia in animals.

In this article, Rollin tries to rationalize the idea that sometimes “we need to kill a few to save many.” The commentary demonstrates a very pragmatic and logical approach in dealing with euthanasia of animals. Rollin’s commentary is well-balanced as he also pointed out that the differences in perspectives in euthanasia is sole based on the differences in ethical principles of humans. While Rollin acknowledges the fact that there are various ways to provide animals with the so-called “good death,” Rollin recommends that we must be vigilant in terms of the true nature or purpose of euthanasia.

Works Cited

Chao, D. V. K., N. Y. Chan and W. Y. Chan. “Euthanasia Revisited.” Family Practice, 19 (2002): 128-134. Print.
Clevenger, J. and P. H. Kass. “Determinants of Adoption and Euthanasia of Shelter Dogs Spayed or Neutered in the University of California Veterinary Student Surgery Program Compared to Other Shelter Dogs.” Journal of Veterinary Medicine Education, 30.4 (2003): 372-378. Print.
Kure, J. Euthanasia–“The Good Death” Controversy in Humans and Animals. Rijeka, Croatia: InTech, 2011. Print.
Rollin, B. E. “Ethics and Euthanasia.” Commentary. The Canadian Veterinary Journal, 50.10 (2009):1081-1086. Print.

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